Features
27 Mar 19

Auction-based ride-hailing, powered by HERE

Anterin is an Indonesian ride-hailing company that offers delivery services by motorcycle, motorcycle and car-hailing and courier services for larger items, using vans and trucks. The company is founded in 2016 to challenge the country’s major players, the Singapore-based Grab and local hero Go-Jek. According to Crunchbase, the Anterin applications are downloaded over 20,000 times a month, of which roughly two third goes to the driver application and one third to the user app.

The company is privately owned and no information is known about its owners or funding partners.

A new concept

What we do know about Anterin is its very different pricing model. Grab and Go-Jek use a surge pricing or dynamic pricing model, where the cost of the ride increases when demand is high. Anterin however, uses an auction based pricing model: the driver sets the pricing and the users selects amongst different drivers, according to their preference.

With the auction system comes an unique feature: the possibility for the users to enter various criteria in their search for the best ride: pricing, vehicle type, vehicle brand, rating and even the driver’s gender. Thanks to the selection criteria, a service differentiation is created within the same product.

The white space

Anterin is one of the first mobility providers to unlock a solution to one of the main challenges in the mobility ecosystem, the so-called “white space”. This refers to the paradigm that mobility is easy to sell to people who consider it an upgrade compared to public transport, but much more difficult to car users, who see mobility solutions as a downgrade compared to the private car.

By offering various options, from basic to luxury, the mobility user is given the opportunity to enjoy a better experience, regardless whether they own a car or not.

Ready for growth

In its short existence, Anterin has become Indonesia’s number 3 ride-hailing provider. It’s obviously riding the waves of on-demand popularity, but it’s different identity seems to appeal to the Indonesian user. Currently operating in greater Jakarta (Jakarta, Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi), the company will be rolling out in other Indonesian cities.

To ensure growth, Anterin needs best-in-class location data services, which it has found at HERE Technologies, a Chicago based mapping company that finds its origins in Navteq, which was rebranded Nokia Maps before settling for its current name, HERE. The company was acquired by Audi, BMW and Mercedes in 2015, later joined by Intel, Pioneer and recently by Continental and Bosch.

It is clear that Anterin is onto something. A virtually unlimited variety of service levels at a market-driving auction pricing and fully transparent for the user, might well be the way into markets, such as Japan, that refuse dynamic pricing models.

Authored by: Yves Helven